Insight Interview: Nomyn

A renowned icon in the ambient future garage scene, Nomyn has been captivating and engaging listeners with his ethereal musical style for over seven years.

‘Painting Soundscapes’ is how French producer Nomyn describes his music. The emotive melodies and intricate soundscapes blend elements of ambient, chillwave and future garage, a combination of depth and talent that has seen his skills widely recognised across the community.

He is one of the incredibly talented and fortunate musicians that can live freely from their craft. His passion, dedication and seven year musical journey has allowed him to focus on producing music that resonates with fans on a global scale, and is one aspect of his life that he continues to recognise with great thanks.

Within this truly special Insight interview, Nomyn speaks out about his musical journey, inspirations and passion for community support. And to honour this amazing artist, we have created the perfect YouTube playlist, featuring over 30 singles from Nomyn that we’ve proudly promoted over the years.

Nomyn, it’s finally great to have you here! Please tell us a little about yourself.

Hey! My name is Damien and I produce electronic music under the name Nomyn.

I live in France and making music is my job, but my first formation and profession is clinical psychologist specialising in art therapy.

“When I started making music, I always knew that I wanted to make music that was rather calm and relaxing, because it matched my personality and my way of being, and it was also the musical universe that spoke to me the most of all the genres I listened to.”

Nomyn Music Producer
French producer Nomyn has an impressive catalogue of music that spans all the way back to October 2015 on Bandcamp.

Can you remember some of your earliest musical memories? What does music mean to you?

Music has always been a part of my life. When I was a kid, my parents used to listen to music all the time, and my dad played drums a lot. Growing up, music became even more important because it allowed me to escape reality, or simply make it more interesting, but also to channel my emotions. Before I even thought about doing it myself, music was already one of the most important things in my life.

Now, this makes even more sense. I would say that music is for me a language of emotion that possesses an extremely powerful power.

Without this particular attraction to music my life would certainly not be the same.

“I think my audience has given me a creative freedom that I love enormously. No matter what kind of energy I propose in a song, no matter the influences, people receive this with incredible commitment and kindness.”

What brought you towards Ambient and Garage music?

When I started making music, I always knew that I wanted to make music that was rather calm and relaxing, because it matched my personality and my way of being, and it was also the musical universe that spoke to me the most of all the genres I listened to.

My first inspirations at the time were related to the Youtube channel MrSuicideSheep and the discovery of Rameses B and Blackmill.

Over time, I evolved as a listener, and this evolution influenced my production. More precisely, when I discovered the artists Azaleh, AK (Aljosha Konstanty), Tim Schaufert and Sublab, I was introduced to this huge universe, and it was like a revelation.

I understood that these genres in particular reflected everything I liked the most: emotion, depth, melodies, vocal atmospheres.

And from that moment on I began to gradually introduce these new influences which then became among my standards.

I know a few of us here would love to know about your creative process! Where does it start? Is there a specific inspiration?

My creative process is never really the same. Most of the time I look for a first foundation, which can be a melody, or chords in a more basic way. But it can also happen to me to start with a rhythm or even a bassline.

That being said, I always start in general by building the “drop”, the part having the most energy and elements, and then structure the song around that.

I really like the work of sample, so it can also happen to start with the experimentation of a sample, with different processes.

I also wonder about what kind of energy I want to create, something rather slow, rather fast, and with what influences I’m gonna work.

How about gear: do you use any equipment?

I don’t really use any particular equipment except my MIDI keyboard. Otherwise, I have a rather classic installation with speakers, a subwoofer, and a sound card.

“I would say that one of the most important things is to find your universe. The one that inspires you the most, and what musical genres are part of it.”

If you had to name one, what piece of yours are you most proud of (and why)?

This question is as interesting as it is difficult at the same time.

Making a single choice is really complicated but I would say that ‘Fragments’ is probably one of my favourite creations, because I think that it defines well what ‘Nomyn’ is, either musically or in the approach of my way of producing.

But there are others, and some also who are not yet out on time where I write these lines.

You’ve been releasing gems on Bandcamp since 2015, what’s the key to your consistency? What’s in the future for Nomyn?

I would say the key to my consistency is the culture of inspiration and the discipline.

When I’m not doing music, I listen to music. I’m very curious and I’m also a listener before I’m a producer. Listening to a lot of music of different genres helps me to cultivate my inspiration, discovering new artists, new influences.

Then there is the discipline in producing every day, having a rhythm that allows me to get projects out every month.

The future is still quite cloudy for me, I don’t project myself much and I prefer to do my best in the present. Therefore, I would say that I want to continue to develop my universe and my audience in the future. Multiply collaborations, and potentially start planning bigger projects.

Your socials are rich with giving thanks to your audience. How does your community support inspire you to create?

I think my audience has given me a creative freedom that I love enormously. No matter what kind of energy I propose in a song, no matter the influences, people receive this with incredible commitment and kindness.

I understood that this was because my audience was enjoying my entire universe, but it’s still really great for an artist.

It is true that I often thank my audience for existing, for supporting me, but I cannot say it enough.

The truth is, when I started making music, I never imagined for a second that I could live a single percentage of everything I’ve been through so far. And living from my music was not even conceivable. I knew how difficult it was and I told myself that anyway I would never be good enough to get there, but that was okay. My goal was not to live from my music, but just trying to share emotions with a few people.

I always remember my first 100 followers on Soundcloud. At the time it was amazing because I was able to transmit feelings.

Almost 7 years later, I find it incredible how far I have come and I still have trouble to realise it when I take a step back. There’s always that part of me that doesn’t believe in it. That’s why I will never stop thanking the people who support me.

As a successful independent musician, what advice would you give to newer and/or smaller aspiring artists?

Being an artist in our time is a great thing, but at the same time a difficult thing. There are so many new artists that it can be complicated to know where to start.

I would say that one of the most important things is to find your universe. The one that inspires you the most, and what musical genres are part of it. This is already a question that can be very difficult. Experimenting with different styles and listening to a lot of music can help find leads and answers.

Then you need to develop this universe, and I would say patience and hard work are the keys. You have to produce a lot, you have to learn, you have to be curious. You have to watch videos of productions, videos of other artists, you have to analyse the music you listen to, why you like that music, how it’s structured, that kind of thing.

By improving its technique and developing its universe, it is easier to produce more, and therefore to get out of projects.

You should also not neglect the aspect a little more “marketing”. I know not everyone likes it, but you have to promote what you do. Whether it’s through the networks, on YouTube, you have to show the existence of your universe to make it grow progressively.

I would also say that you must not be too exigent with yourselves, and do it mainly because you love it deeply. Do not make music to “become known” at all costs or to be “trendy” on TikTok, do it because it is in you deeply.

If you love what you do, you’ll be consistent.

I think everyone can find their audience if it is done properly even if we are probably not all destined to the same amount of audience.

Here’s a fun question to end: top 3 artists right now?

Another difficult question for me (everything concerning musical choices)

But right now, I’d say Oscuro, Skeler, Pensees.

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Big thank you to Nomyn for this incredible interview! We’d love for you to show thanks to the artist by supporting him on the following platforms:

Soundcloud | YouTube | Bandcamp | Instagram | Twitter

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